HINDMAN: Sebring Debrief

The last few times I have reported to you all, the results have been good, with maybe a few hiccups along the way.

I know that I included the rollercoaster that is the Rolex 24 in my last blog, but luckily Cameron Cassels and I were at least able to walk away from Daytona with a win in the Continental Tire Sports Car Challenge four hour enduro.

This time we we were not so lucky.

Getting down to Sebring a day earlier than expected due to some impending bad weather in the northeast turned out to be pretty beneficial, as our engineer Marc Manning, Cameron, and I were able to take advantage of the down time to walk the track and finalize strategies for the upcoming weekend.

All of the Porsche Cayman GT4s received a few Balance of Performance penalties post-Daytona, so that was certainly a major concern of ours coming into the weekend.

Argue as much as you want, but at the end of the day the only thing we can do is try our best to work around some of these penalties and continue moving forward as we knew we could. Complaining about it will never make your car magically go faster.

Throughout our test day on Wednesday and official practice on Thursday, it was clear that we had some work to do.

We were strong when compared to the other Porsches, but at the end of the day on Thursday we knew we still had to find more time, consistently, to be able to challenge for victory number two at Sebring.

There was very little doubt in my mind that we could get a little bit closer to the quickest GS cars, but it was going to take more effort and more time. Unfortunately more time was something we did not have.

This time last year, Cameron Cassels and I barely even knew each other or the crew that we were working with, so to walk away with a win at Sebring in our very first attempt was something that certainly caught us by surprise.

Along with that we were able to bring home the first win for the Porsche Cayman GT4 platform in global competition – a huge honor for such a new program at that point in time.

Knowing all of this, I certainly felt some additional pressure on my shoulders to go out and make it two in a row at Sebring for Bodymotion Racing.

Come race day, the new-for-2017 two-hour race format was a scenario we had prepared for quite well, so overall race time and strategy were the least of my concerns.

We were still down on pace but close enough to where I could mount an attack at the end of the race as long as we were in position to do so.

Unfortunately, about 30 minutes in, Cameron reported a vibration in the front end of the car that was consistently getting worse – not a good sign around Sebring.

We wanted him to stay out for as long as possible to reach minimum drive time, which he did, right as a full course yellow came out and three of our wheel studs were completely sheered off due to a badly damaged wheel. Not good!

Cam limped the car back to pit lane, we completed our stop, and I hopped behind the wheel. My heart sank as soon as I got the call over the radio to take the car behind the wall for repairs.

At that point I knew we were out of contention for the win, which was far from ideal, but at least there was some hope that we could make our repairs as quickly as possible and get the car back out on track.

In the end, we finished 10th in class, 4 laps down. Disappointing, but thinking about the grand scheme of things, we still kept ourselves in the race to earn points despite our problems – that’s how a team wins championships.

As always, a big thank you to Cameron Cassels, Trim-Tex Drywall Products, and the Bodymotion Racing team for the phenomenal effort all weekend even though the result was not what we were hoping for.

Next up is Circuit of the Americas at the beginning of May and that cannot come soon enough. We will take this time off to correct our mistakes and find our way back to the top step of the podium in Texas.

Bodymotion Racing Finish Top Ten at Sebring

SEBRING, Fla., March 17 — After qualifying third in the Street Tuner (ST) class and running in that position for more than half of Friday’s IMSA Continental Tire SportsCar Challenge race at Sebring International Raceway, Devin Jones and Drake Kemper were relegated to a tenth-place finish after the track’s bumpy surface took a toll on their No. 31 Bodymotion Racing Porsche Cayman.
Bodymotion Racing came into the event as the defending race winners and the winners of the season opener with its Grand Sport entry, the No. 12 Porsche Cayman GT4 Clubsport driven by Cameron Cassels and Trent Hindman. Unfortunately, that car suffered a problem with one of its wheels that caused it to lose several laps, and it ended up tenth in the Grand Sport class at the conclusion of the two-hour race.
Jones, of Mooresville, N.C., started third after qualifying just 0.250 off the ST pole early Friday morning. He ran in third place throughout his stint, which included a fierce battle with Jeff Mosing for second place just after the first half-hour of the race. He pitted under yellow with about 70 minutes to go, turning the car over to Kemper, a rookie from Thermal, Calif.
The pit stop went perfectly, and Kemper was able to start his stint in third also. He remained in that podium position for about 20 minutes until the eventual class winner passed him. What the fans didn’t know was that Kemper was dealing with a suspension problem, but he was able to bring the entry home in one piece.
Things started off well for Cassels, of Coldstream, British Columbia, Canada, until his car developed a vibration that continually got worse. Team owner Mike Bavaro brought that car in for fuel under green just 20 minutes into the race as a strategy move, but it never came into play due to problems with the right- front wheel that forced Cassels to pit with about 52 minutes gone. The team went behind the wall to make repairs and Hindman replaced Cassels in the cockpit and finished the race, but the time lost was far too much for the star from Wayside, N.J. to make up.
Bodymotion’s sponsors — Veristor, Delaware Investments, TrimTex and the Apex Sports Car Academy — are sure to get their share of airtime when the race is shown on Fox Sports 1 at 10:30 a.m. on Sunday, March 26. The team will regroup at its headquarters in Ocean Township, N.J., which was recently named an Approved Porsche Collision Center, and hope for better results at the next event May 4-6 at Circuit of the Americas (COTA) in Austin, Texas.
Post-race quotes follow:
Cameron Cassels, co-driver, No. 12 Bodymotion Racing Porsche Cayman GT4:
“I just noticed as the laps wore on, there was more and more vibration in the car, particularly in the right front. I don’t know what happened yet; we might have sheared off some wheel stubs. Finally at the end, at that last caution lap, coming into Turn 5, I tried to turn hard left and the car just went straight. So I knew there was something really wrong. You could certainly feel it as the laps went on, especially after the stop for a splash of fuel. It was a shame; I think our pit stop strategy could have won the race for us. It’s really, really disappointing because we had a great car and a great strategy.”
Trent Hindman, co-driver, No. 12 Bodymotion Racing Porsche Cayman GT4:
“When you’re leading a championship you’ve obviously got a big target on your back, not just with your other competitors but with the technical gremlins that can sometimes get to you. Unfortunately, they got to us today.
“Ultimately the only thing you can do on days like today is maximize everything you’ve got and, to be honest with you, I’m shocked we’re walking away with 11th-place points. It could have been much worse than that. It’s the result of all the guys coming together, getting the repairs, getting the car back out on track and crossing the line and finishing the two-hour race in one piece, or mostly in one piece. Days like today are what win championships; maximizing the bad days, this is what’s going to pay off at the end of the year. It takes every last little point we can get to count, and you’ve got to think big picture. This is just extra motivation we’re going to use going forward into COTA.”
Michael Bavaro, team owner:
“It’s a disappointing day because the ST car qualified so well and we had a suspension failure on that car, but we soldiered home. I think they did a great job, considering what broke, that they were even able to finish.
“The No. 12 car had broken lug nuts and a broken wheel and we were able to change it pretty quick, but we had to go behind the wall so we lost a few laps there. We finished the race running and we need the points.
“It’s a season-long commitment so we have to take the points and move on to COTA for our next round and keep our chin up. We’ll go back [to the shop] and fix the cars.
“I think everybody showed real good form today. For the season to come I think we’re going to have something for these McLarens and these Mustangs. In both classes [GS and ST], we belong in that lead battle. I can imagine our cars would have been right up in there had we not had problems. We’ll look forward to COTA.”
Devin Jones, co-driver, No. 31 Bodymotion Racing Porsche Cayman:
“We had pretty high expectations coming into this race. We were really solid in qualifying, and came close to the pole there. But we had some issues with the frame of the car that we found last night after the second practice. We couldn’t do a permanent fix, but the guys did a good job bolting something up and getting it so hopefully we could make it through the race. I think during my stint the car held together pretty good and we were able to maintain third, but later in the run when Drake got in, that problem came up again.
“The guys did a good job welding it together though. We weren’t sure we would even get on track yesterday. They did a good job getting it back together. We’re disappointed that we couldn’t get a better finish, but I think everybody rallied pretty well. Once we get some of these issues worked out, I think we’ll be tough to beat.”
Drake Kemper, co-driver, No. 31 Bodymotion Racing Porsche Cayman:
“I’m a tad disappointed for the Bodymotion crew. These guys worked tirelessly last night to get the car back up and running. Devin Jones put in a phenomenal first stint, and really it was my race to lose at that point, which definitely happened. We battled up front for a little while, and then an inherent problem from last night, the one we were fixing, became unstuck again. It got worse and worse, and I just did everything I could to hang onto the thing. At least I’m proud that the car is in one piece, and we’ll go to COTA and try again, once we get that problem fixed.”
For more information, go to Bodymotion.com.

HINDMAN: Daytona Debrief

To me, every win, podium, or even race finish will be hard fought no matter what because we will always be going for the win.

This-four hour Continental Tire SportsCar Challenge race at Daytona was amongst the hardest fought races that I have ever competed in. If it was one thing above all else though, it was simply a hell of a lot of fun!

After the Roar Before the 24, Cameron Cassels, Bodymotion Racing, and I all knew we had quite a lot of work that needed to be done in order to be competitive once we returned to Daytona for our first race of 2017.

Although we were very confident in our Porsche Cayman GT4 Clubsport that we had already raced for a year, there were still some questions about how we would perform against some of the beautiful, brand new SRO GT4 machinery that were making their debut in GS competition.

When it finally came time to practice on Thursday morning, we were quite surprised to find ourselves at the top of the time sheets in our morning session.

All of us at Bodymotion Racing knew that now more than ever it was not about setting that one quick lap; rather, the name of the game here was to have a strong car at the end of a proper four hour endurance event.

Throughout the rest of the day we shifted our focus to A) getting Cameron more comfortable in a car that was going to lose its rear tire at the end of a stint, and B) figuring out how we were not going to lose our rear tire at the end of a stint! We were also dealing with a pretty big unknown considering all GS teams were using a brand new spec Continental tire.

You know, unfortunately you hear a fair amount of folks around the paddock, some that are not even drivers, mentioning some negative comments about the tire that Continental puts out on the racetrack.

In my experience in the series, they have been nothing but consistent and reliable. Think of it this way – Continental is tasked with an extremely unique challenge in the sense that they have to create a tire that works on a multitude of different cars and racetracks.

How the hell they can engineer a tire that is reliable, gives good feel and feedback to the driver, yet can be fitted on a little Porsche Cayman GT4 or a car as brutal as a Ford Mustang GT4 is really very impressive.

Hats off to the guys and gals at Continental who make it happen.

Improvements made pre-qualifying were still not quite what we needed to win Friday’s four-hour enduro and the decision was made to run the pre-race warm-up early Friday morning.

Honestly, I felt more weight on my shoulders going into that warmup than I did going into the race! So many times have we seen cars get torn up to the point where they are forced to withdraw from the race by really pointless incidents in the Daytona morning warm-up.

I was concerned, but luckily made it through… Then came the next challenge as we made a swap last minute as to who would be starting the car, forcing us to the very back of the GS grid.

Again, nerves were quite high as we were surrounded by drivers with whom I have never shared a racetrack with, so there were simply a lot of unknowns.

Fortunately we made a great start and opening stint, and I was able to hand the car off to Cameron from P2. From then on, the man himself drove out of his damn mind!

I am very proud to see the progress Cam has made in less than 12 months, as he never fell outside of the top-ten and even lead the field on a restart. Lots of pressure on a guy who has not been road racing for very long.

With roughly two hours remaining, it was my turn to hop back in the car and finish off the race. I knew it was going to be a fight as many teams were on similar strategies and we had some really, really fast cars to work through.

Over the next two stints in the car and the final two pitstops, we had battled our way back to the lead… then the fun began. A short full course caution with less than ten minutes to go in the race meant a sprint to the finish with a tired car and a winner-take-all scenario.

I was confident in what we had underneath me, as this is the exact scenario we had worked on in practice.

Patience on the restart, and two clean, mistake free laps and we were fortunate to find ourselves in victory lane at Daytona!

A first for me personally on three attempts and coming close twice, which made this very special and a hell of a way to start Bodymotion’s 2017 campaign.

In between all of the excitement with our GS program, I was also very fortunate to be teamed up with Johnny Mowlem, Adam Merzon, David Cheng, and Tom Papadopolous in the BAR1 Motorsports Prototype Challenge car.

These are guys who all have some experience in prototypes, so there was certainly a lot for me to learn coming from the GT side of things. Luckily, past open wheel experience played a huge roll in getting acclimated to this style of car as there was very little time to do so on the racetrack.

My first ever stint in a Rolex 24 came just before the skies opened up, from about 7-9pm Saturday night. I thought that was a fun one but I got back in the car about 1 a.m. when the rain was really starting to pick up and I did not get out until about 3:30 a.m… Yes it was cold, very cold, but probably about the most fun I have ever had in a racecar.

Seriously, between all of the spray, traffic, the horrible need to use the bathroom, no feeling in my hands or feet, and the constant thought that you were going to end up in the fence at any moment, it was a great stint since the No. 26 Case-It, BAR1 PC was making up quite some time to the leaders!

Unfortunately all of that fun quickly came to an end when we had an ECU that shorted due to the amount of water, and that, for the most part decided our race. That issue, coupled with a pesky fuel pick up problem, haunted us since the very start of the race.

It was disappointing because we thought that as long as we kept the car on the “island”, pointed straight, that we would have a shot at getting one of those beautiful Rolex Daytona watches, all while giving Johnny Mowlem a proper send off in his final professional race.

That Cinderella ending never came but the experience was still surreal as I believe most drivers’ first Rolex 24 would be. Nonetheless, capping the weekend off with a second place finish in LMPC certainly is not a bad thing!

All of that cold rain has now finally caught up to me as I sit home, typing this with a pretty gnarly flu.

It’s amazing how long adrenaline can keep you going but it all comes crashing down at some point or another. Either way, if a flu is the worst thing I walk away from the Rolex 24 with, I will take it every time!

A huge thank you to all who made such a fantastic weekend possible; Bodymotion Racing, Cameron Cassels, Brian Alder and his entire BAR1 Motorsports team, Adam Merzon and Case-It, and Trim-Tex Drywall Products. See you all in Sebring.

HINDMAN: Valencia Debrief

What a sweet end to a pretty amazing season! I think that is the best way to describe Lamborghini Blancpain Super Trofeo North America in 2016 that both Craig and I had experienced this year.

It was a new category for us both and the learning curve was immense, but I am very proud to say that Prestige Performance, Wayne Taylor Racing, Lamborghini Paramus, Craig Duerson and I were able to lock up a Pro-Am championship title in our first attempt.

It certainly did not go without a fight… that’s for sure.

Still reminiscing on what could have been done in COTA, I feel that the disappointment of not getting the Pro-Am title locked up in September was what really lit the fire in the whole Prestige Performance team.

Losing our brakes in Race 2 at Watkins Glen, power steering issues at Road America, and finally getting taken out on Lap 1 by another competitor at COTA saw us scrapping for this title for much longer than we would have liked.

Ultimately, we had a lot of confidence in our Prestige Performance/WTR team and going into Valencia we knew that the pressure on us would only motivate the entire team further.

From the time we arrived on Monday, Nov. 27th, all focus was on winning a second driver’s championship for Prestige in 2016.

On my flight to Spain, I dreamt of beautiful sunny skies and decent temperatures but in reality we had the exact opposite for almost the entire week at Circuit Ricardo Tormo.

Nonetheless it was a massive relief to open up each shipping container, packed and shipped almost two months prior to this event, and find that our cars and equipment had made it overseas safely.

The unloading process was extremely quick and we soon found out that there were another two full days of waiting until we finally would hit the track – a very excruciating experience!

Having the opportunity to walk the track on Wednesday afternoon, I quickly realized that although this place was much different compared to what we are used to here in North America, Circuit Ricardo Tormo would become one of my favorites.

Packed quite cleverly in a relatively small area, the 2.48-mile circuit has a fantastic mix of high and low speed corners, useable curbing, a smooth surface, and camber… oh the camber!

For a racetrack that does not follow the natural terrain of the land it sits on, it proved to have a wonderful feel and rhythm to it, or at least I thought it did.

Testing was, well, testing to say the least. Between the constant changing weather and some strange issues with the car, we lost some quality track time on Thursday; the absolute last thing we needed going to a track and environment that we have never experienced before.

Luckily we did show some speed which was promising, but making that speed last for an entire 50-minute race is always a whole other challenge.

Our qualifying runs for our two North American Championship finale races on Friday were not our best, but with our focus solely set on winning a championship, we did exactly what we needed to do.

Since our approach for our final two races was conservative, I was pushing hard to use these races as test sessions, if you will, to continue making changes and improving our car for the two World Final races on Saturday and Sunday.

Aside from a few close calls and some nail biting, by the end of the day on Friday our initial goal for the season was accomplished and the Prestige Performance/Wayne Taylor Racing team were now Super Trofeo North America Pro, Pro-Am, driver’s, team, and dealership champions!

This was an accomplishment that was much deserved by every single member of this team, as we all worked very hard to make this a reality from day one.

The high of winning a championship did not last long as we now had to prove ourselves against the rest of the world.

Seeing the pace that was being set by the European Pro and Pro-Am teams, I knew that much work had to be done in order for us to even have a chance of competing with those guys.

In comparison to the rest of the North American and Asian series contenders, Craig and I were very strong, but unfortunately there wasn’t much comparison to the European Pro/Pro-Am leaders. We were gearing up for a tough fight.

I have been lucky to spend some time competing in Europe throughout these last few years, and at the start of race one I figured we would encounter some carnage on the first lap being that we were mid-pack.

Luckily we made it through cleanly and began to push our way forward from there. I’m not entirely too sure where we were when I handed the car off to Craig, but I knew it was far from where I would’ve liked to be and I just had to hope for the best.

Race 1 saw a hard-fought 15th place result, which none of us were thrilled about but we still had Sunday and one more race to redeem ourselves.

Waking up to pouring rain on Sunday morning had me thinking that this could potentially be a great thing for us. Craig has tons of experience racing in the wet at places such as Sebring and Mid-Ohio, which are incredibly difficult places to drive in the rain.

Some added confidence and a few changes overnight had all of us feeling that we could make a charge from the back of the pack and go back to the U.S. feeling that we made a good showing.

Unfortunately this was no Cinderella story and we finished Race 2 in 18th position. None of us were proud by any means, and it was an even tougher pill to swallow considering the effort and hard work put in by everybody on the Prestige Performance/WTR team.

I believe this was a necessary experience for all of us, as now we know just how much we need to find in order to be competitive on the world stage.

Nonetheless it was still an excellent weekend as we accomplished our initial goal of winning the Pro-Am title.

This was a scenario where as soon as you get out of the car, you immediately want to get back in and have another crack at it… one of those “if I knew then what I know now” sort of deals, but it is what it is.

It was an incredible learning experience for us all and I would absolutely love to find my way back to Lamborghini Super Trofeo in some way, shape, or form next year.

Super Trofeo is really a championship that is gaining tons of momentum and becoming more prestigious and difficult to win It is a challenge that I certainly do not want to walk away from just yet.

I would like to give one massive thank you to Mark, Chris, and all of the folks from the Prestige Family of Fine Automobiles for giving me the opportunity to drive such a beautiful beast all year long.

Also, a huge thank you to Wayne, Ricky, Jordan, Max, David, and the entire team from Wayne Taylor Racing. It’s no secret that long hours and hard work turns into luck in this industry. These guys and gals created that luck for Craig, Shinya, and me to be successful and bring home championships.

Finally, a big thank you to John Dagys and all of you who spent some time reading these debriefs all year long.

It’s been an absolute pleasure sharing my experiences, and I hope I will be reporting back to you all in 2017. See you in Daytona (hopefully)!

Michimi, Duerson, Hindman, Ockey, Chouest Celebrate Lamborghini Blancpain Super Trofeo North America Titles at Valencia

  • Craig Duerson, Trent Hindman prevail by two points in tight Pro-Am title race.
  • Damon Ockey holds off Luis Rodriguez Jr. for Am championship.
  • North American Champion Chouest caps superb season with World Championship.

Sant’Agata Bolognese  (Dec. 5, 2016) –  Craig Duerson, Trent Hindman and Damon Ockey secured Lamborghini Blancpain Super Trofeo North America season titles Dec. 1-2 in the final two rounds of the season at Valencia, Spain, joining Shinya Michimi and Ross Chouest as 2016 class champions.

Duerson and Hindman combined to finish second and third, respectively, in Rounds 11 and 12 at Circuit Ricardo Tormo. That was enough to deliver the Pro-Am championship by just two points, 134-132, over Brandon Gdovic, who won both rounds at Valencia.

Ockey finished second and first, respectively, in the final two rounds to secure the Amateur championship, 144-131, over Luis Rodriguez Jr.

Michimi and Chouest clinched the Pro and Lamborghini Cup season championships after Rounds 9 and 10 in September at Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas.

Chouest capped his fantastic season by also winning the World Championship in the Lamborghini Cup class during the World Final on Dec. 3-4 at Valencia.

Prestige Performance already clinched the Team Championship in September at Circuit of the Americas.

Series veteran Antinucci dominated en route to victory in the No. 116 entry representing Lamborghini Carolinas in the final two 50-minute rounds of the North American series season at Valencia.

Antinucci drove to a 39.765-second over Pro-Am class winner Gdovic in the No. 146 entry representing Lamborghini Palm Beach in Round 11. Antinucci took the lead after the mid-race pit stops and never trailed thereafter.

Michimi overcame a late-race incident to climb from fifth to third, seizing the final overall spot on the podium and second in the Pro class in the No. 101 entry representing Lamborghini Paramus. Emmanuel Anassis rounded out the top three in the Pro class in the No. 118 entry representing Lamborghini Palm Beach.

Duerson and Hindman finished second in Pro-Am in the No. 110 entry representing Lamborghini Paramus. The team of Patrick Kujala and Brian Thienes placed third in the Pro-Am class in the No. 117 entry representing Lamborghini Beverly Hills. They led the race overall before the first pit stops.

Rodriguez won the Amateur class in Round 11 in the No. 129 entry representing Lamborghini Carolinas. Ockey finished second in the No. 109 entry representing Lamborghini Calgary.

Chouest returned to his winning ways by taking first place in the Lamborghini Cup class in the No. 103 entry representing Lamborghini Miami. Shawn Lawless was second in the No. 127 entry representing Lamborghini Las Vegas, followed by Jackie Heinricher in the No. 157 entry representing Lamborghini Palm Beach.

In Round 12, Antinucci never trailed other than during his mandatory pit stop and cruised to a 21.744-second victory over Michimi. The Asian series tandem of Toshiyuki Ochiai and Afiq Yazid finished third overall, as the North American and Asian series raced together on the 2.489-mile (4.005 km) circuit in their respective final two rounds at Valencia.

Gdovic completed his sweep of the Pro-Am class during the event and finished fourth overall, holding off a charge by Kujala and Thienes, who placed second in class and fifth overall. Hindman and Duerson ended up third in the Pro-Am class race, with a season championship secured.

Ockey closed his championship season with an Amateur class victory in Round 12, followed by Rodriguez.

Lawless edged Chouest for the win in Lamborghini Cup in Round 12, with Heinricher rounding out the class podium for the second straight race.

The two rounds of racing at were part of the worldwide Super Trofeo action this weekend at Valencia Super Trofeo Europe and Asia also each contested their final two rounds of the season before drivers from all three series competed in the World Final.

Lamborghini and Blancpain provided world-class hospitality at Valencia for clients and guests of Lamborghini dealers.

The 2017 Lamborghini Blancpain Super Trofeo North America season starts May 4-6 at Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas. The 2017 World Final is scheduled for Nov. 16-19 at Imola, Italy, where the final two rounds of the North American series also will take place.

 

POST-RACE QUOTES

 

SHINYA MICHIMI (No. 101 Lamborghini Paramus, 2016 Pro series champion): “I’ve really got to thank everyone at Prestige Performance. They’ve done a really good job. I’ve also got to thank IMSA for running the series. They’ve done a really good job with officiating. It was a dream season for me. I did all my karting in the United States, born and raised in the United States. When I switched the cars, I left for four years. My first year back, I get my first-ever championship. It’s been really nice to do it in my home country.”

 

CRAIG DUERSON (No. 110 Lamborghini Paramus, 2016 Pro-Am series champion): “I just have to thank Wayne Taylor Racing, Prestige Performance and the crew. This is a group effort. My co-driver, Trent. Shinya (Michimi) helped a lot with teaching us how to drive the car. It takes a whole team to pull this off. Even in adversity, we did a really good job of pulling together and collecting points. The goal was to win the championship. I’m honored to be a part of this and look forward to doing it again.”

TRENT HINDMAN (No. 110 Lamborghini Paramus, 2016 Pro-Am series champion): “Just a huge thank you to Prestige Performance. It was really a great season. We wish we could have made things a little bit less eventful here in Valencia. Wish we could have locked it up in COTA, but, hey, you can’t be greedy about it. We’re very proud and thankful for what we’ve done. It was pleasure working with Craig (Duerson) and Shinya (Michimi). I hope we can continue this.”

ROSS CHOUEST (No. 103 Lamborghini Miami, 2016 Lamborghini Cup series champion and World Champion): “I want to thank my team, DXDT Racing. They gave me a great car all season. My coach, Aaron Povoledo, really helped prepare me for every race this season. We had a really successful season. Thanks to my sponsors, family and friends who came out to support me in Valencia. It didn’t take a whole lot of convincing to get them to come to Spain, but it’s nice to have the support here.” (About 2017): “I’m looking forward to progressing and keep getting faster as a driver. I want to continue to get better each weekend. I look forward to stepping up and racing against better competition.”

All of all the races are available to watch on the official YouTube channel of Automobili Lamborghini, at http://www.youtube.com/lamborghini.

 

Page 2 of 3712345...102030...Last »